Tag Archives: gourmet

Marker 39 Floribbean Cuisine

Marker 39 Floribbean Cuisine in Safety Harbor Florida is an award winning chef owned & operated restaurant, offering innovative Caribbean and Latin-American inspired dishes. Enjoy al fresco patio dining  amidst canopies of tropical foliage under the sail shades on our outdoor deck or cool down with a glass of wine or craft beer in our bistro dining room & classic Florida style wine bar which is adorned with improvised local art and nautical decor. Our menu is Florida-Caribbean (Floribbean) and Latin American fusion cuisine infused with Asian inspiration as well as re-imagined American classics and creative vegetarian options. Located in the heart of beautiful downtown Safety Harbor FL, Marker 39 has quickly become a favorite in the growing Safety Harbor restaurant scene.

Open for dinner nightly from 5 to 9:30 and 5 to 10:30 on weekends. Sunday brunch 11-4. Closed Mondays & Tuesdays.

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Marker 39 Floribbean Cuisine
155 5th Avenue North
Safety Harbor, Fl  34695
(727) 791-1939

Welcome!  Below are a few photos of some new small plate ideas I’ve been working on including: chili crusted tuna tataki, bobwhite quail w blue corn arepas, vanilla spiked foie w barrel aged burbon and 24 hr sous-vide short rib w syrah redux. Ultimately, the goal here will be to post easy recipes of dishes like these along with plating notes, a step by step photographic guide and wine pairing suggestions. I would love to hear any requests for specific dishes from our readers and of course, #wine pairing suggestions are always welcome. Hope you enjoy!

foie gras, lady apple, tahitian vanilla, barrel aged bourbon maple syrup

foie gras, lady apple, tahitian vanilla, barrel aged bourbon maple syrup

Tuna Tataki, Fennel Slaw, Florida Navel, Chili Syrup

Tuna Tataki, Fennel Slaw, Florida Navel, Chili Syrup

Bobwhite Florida Quail, Blue Corn Cakes, Roast Plum, Guajillo Plum Sauce

Bobwhite Florida Quail, Blue Corn Cakes, Roast Plum, Guajillo Plum Sauce

Bobwhite Florida Quail, Blue Corn Cakes, Roast Plum, Guajillo Plum Sauce

Bobwhite Florida Quail, Blue Corn Cakes, Roast Plum, Guajillo Plum Sauce

Salted Caramel-Pretzel Brownie, vanilla bean gelato, chocolate dipped "cocoa puffs"

Salted Caramel-Pretzel Brownie, vanilla bean gelato, chocolate dipped “cocoa puffs”

Fresh Pasta with Vegetables and a Deliciously Wicked Martini

We LOVE this summery Fresh #Pasta with Vegetables, and a Deliciously Wicked #Martini doesn’t hurt either! http://justin-thyme.com/

basil & salt magazine

We have enjoyed a very warm, relatively rain free summer this year in the Pacific Northwest and while I am sorry to see the days becoming shorter, I am eagerly anticipating fall.

This season we are working with fresh fruits and vegetables more than we have any other year in the past.  Living in the Orting Valley has been a wonderful experience, and I have enjoyed the local farms and their seasonal harvests.

Spring Vegetable Ragout with Fresh PastaSpring Vegetable Ragout with Fresh Pastaby Fine Cooking.  A delightfully fresh addition to any weeknight meal, that takes just a few minutes of prep time from start to table. The shopping list may take some to gather, however you will have a fantastic time walking the market in search of the freshest ingredients.  Shopping list;  Pasta sheets, garlic, mixed spring veggies~your choice, shelled peas or fava beans, pea shoots or watercress sprigs ( delicious )…

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Huevos Rancheros, A Fiesta Of Flavors

Huevos rancheros is a popular breakfast dish consisting of eggs served in the style of the traditional large mid-morning fare on rural Mexican farms.

The basic dish consists of fried eggs served upon lightly fried corn tortillas topped with a tomato-chili sauce. Refried beans, Mexican-style rice, slices of avocado, or guacamole are common accompaniments. Share your version of this classic dish with us!

Back Road Journal

The classic Mexican dish, Huevos Rancheros,  Is A Fiesta Of Flavors.  Fried eggs sitting on top of corn tortillas and served with a rustic tomato chili ranchero sauce can be found all over Mexico. If you travel there on vacation, you will find this dish at a simple  cantina as well as at famous beachside resorts. It is a delicious way to start your day.

What is especially nice about this classic egg dish is that it doesn’t have to be relegated to just an early morning breakfast although it is quick and easy to prepare. Countless people celebrating Cinco de Mayo with friends love serving this dish as part of a Mexican themed brunch along with pitchers of Margaritas. But we also know that eggs aren’t just for breakfast any more, and I like preparing huevos rancheros for an evening meal.

Ask a hundred cooks or chefs how…

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Recipe: Key Lime Tartlets

Recipe: Key Lime Tartlets.

Key Lime Tartlets

Recipe: Mango Salsa

The mango is a very common tropical fruit usually found in Southern Asia, especially in Eastern India, Philippines, China, Burma, Andaman Islands and Central America. It is cultivated and grown vastly in many tropical regions and widely distributed in the world.

Mango is one of the most extensively used fruit for food, juices, flavor and coloring making it as the most functional fruit. The ripe fruit is variable in size and color, and may be yellow, orange, red or green when ripe, depending on the cultivar. When it is ripe refreshingly sweet taste that varies from every variety. Its flesh has its fibrous and some are soft and pulpy texture.

One of my favorite uses for mango is fresh salsa. It makes a great accompaniment to all sorts of grilled fish and chicken recipes.

Ripe Mango

cubed Mango for salsa

Ingredients for Mango Salsa:
  • 2 peeled, pitted and diced small
  • 1/2 large red bell pepper, diced small
  • 1 Tbsp medium red onion, finely chopped
  • 1 /2 small european cucumber, peeled and diced
  • 3 Tbsp finely chopped fresh cilantro leaves
  • 2 Tbsp chopeed scallion
  • 1 Tbsp rice wine vinegar
  • 1/2 Tsp sugar
  • 3 Tbsp fresh lime juice
  • 2 T extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 tsp. toasted mustard seed
  • Salt and Pepper
Directions:
  1. Chop mango, red pepper, cucumber, scallion and red onion and combine in a bowl.
  2. Mix lime juice, olive oil, sugar mustard seeds & salt and pepper in a small bowl, whisk together.
  3. Mix into salsa.
  4. Add chopped cilantro and stir until combined.
  5. Enjoy with fresh tortilla chips, on grilled fish or chicken or as an accompaniment to a fresh green salad

mango salsa

History of Mango:

Native to southern Asia, especially eastern India, Burma, and the Andaman Islands, the mango has been cultivated, praised and even revered in its homeland since Ancient times. Buddhist monks are believed to have taken the mango on voyages to Malaya and eastern Asia in the 4th and 5th Centuries B.C.

The Persians are said to have carried it to East Africa about the 10th Century A.D. It was commonly grown in the East Indies before the earliest visits of the Portuguese who apparently introduced it to West Africa early in the 16th Century and also into Brazil. After becoming established in Brazil, the mango was carried to the West Indies, being first planted in Barbados about 1742 and later in the Dominican Republic. It reached Jamaica about 1782 and, early in the 19th Century, reached Mexico from the Philippines and the West Indies.

Ripe Mango on the vine

Source: Julia F. Morton’s “Fruits of Warm Climates”: Mango

Note: There are a few vari­eties of mango that are com­monly found in Amer­i­can gro­ceries stores. The most com­mon are the Haden, Tommy Atkins, and  Kent vari­eties, all of which have yel­low or green skins with a red­dish blush to them. If you do find an Ataulfo or Cham­pagne mango, it will have a smaller, kidney-like shape, yel­low skin, and small pit, so use 5 or 6 for this recipe. To choose a ripe but firm (com­mon) mango make sure it has a red­dish blush and firm skin. The mango should give slightly when squeezed and be fra­grant. If you acci­den­tally peel a mango that is too green, no wor­ries, cut it into small slices, sea­son with lime juice and sprin­kle with salt. You’ve just made man­goviche! Deli­cious!

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I used to write here, didn’t I?

Time to get back to that. So many superb meals have passed through my kitchen in the last few years…most have been left unblogged, undocumented & forgotten. For some of them that may be for the best, but a lot of these meals should have been shared. So here we are again.

Where to begin? I guess with the now. Honestly, too much has occurred both personally and professionally over the past few years for me to try to recap it all here and now. Some good, some bad, some great, some sad…so I’ll just pick up with the glorious present.

I’m working on getting past my obsession with overly complicated meals, trying to do things a little more simply. Not that I’m abandoning the ridiculous feasts, I’m just realizing that I can cook a whole lot more really great stuff if I just simplify some of it. In preparation for the super bowl on Sunday, I made a batch of chili on Saturday without spending 3 days preparing for it. I stuck to the true spirit of the dish this time.

A good friend of mine, who had the misfortune of leaving his freezer door ajar overnight, bestowed upon me a large chuck roast on Friday. I thought to myself, “questionable chunk of meat? Hmmm…chili!!”

I trimmed it up, got rid of the more questionable parts, and cut it into bite-size chunks. After browning those in a pan with some oil and salt, working in batches and transferring the browned ones to a pot, I sautéed a medium-sized diced red onion in the leftover “meaty-ness”… dumped that in the pot, deglazed the whole thing with a bottle of decent craft beer, then added a can of tomatillos (run through the blender first), a few cans of crushed tomato and some Mexican spice rub that had been given to me by a friends parents down the street. Salt, pepper, chipotle ketchup, smoked paprika, coriander, masa harina and toasted cumin went in, then I let it simmer for a little while.

After some time, it became apparent that the chili needed more veggies in it, so I started digging in the fridge. I found a little container of salsa that someone had brought the night before, along with half a can of chipotle en adobo, so in it went along with some fresh yellow corn. It was still lacking though. Around the same time, I received a fortuitous phone call from someone on their way over to the house, and I asked them to pick me up another jar of salsa, some kidney beans and a six-pack of some decent beer (to drink of course).

**Side note**

OK, I know how a lot of people feel about beans when it comes to chili…some love it, some hate it. Honestly, I could care less. I make chili with them, without them, whatever…it just depends on my mood and the ingredients on hand.

**End of side note**

Once my buddy arrived, I threw in the beans and salsa and let it simmer a little longer. We made some jalapeño/cheddar cornbread muffins and grated up some sharp cheddar cheese, and I was pleasantly surprised! Not quite the same flavor impact of most of the chilli I’ve made, but the ratio of effort : flavor was remarkable. I think that there may be something to the “lazy chili”. . .but I do advise using caution when selecting the meat itself. That can still make or break any pot of chili, no matter how lazy you feel.

Well…it feels good to get the old ball rolling again. I’ll try to keep you all posted more this time around…really. Stop looking at me like that.

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chili

lazy chili